Why You Should Hire a Social Security Disability Attorney

By Disability Group

Filing for Social Security Disability benefits can be complicated and confusing.  Social Security Administration (SSA) does not require you to have an attorney, but having one might make a difference.  Should you hire a lawyer?  California Congressman Robert T. Matsui stated:

“Professional representation is a valuable, and indeed a vital, service.  The disability determination process is complex.”

If you are considering hiring an attorney here is some basic information to help.

How Can A Disability Attorney Help Me?

A disability attorney will help you understand the SSA Disability process and guide you through each step.  There is a lot of paperwork to fill out, deadlines to meet, and documentation to assemble, and claims are often denied because this was done wrong.

A lawyer will also help you develop a winning strategy.  Many people simply do whatever SSA tells them to do, which is often not enough to win benefits.  You need to understand how to prove and win your case, so work with your attorney for a good strategy.

Remember to consult with a lawyer before filing for SSA Disability Benefits. The consultation shouldn’t cost you anything.  By understanding the SSA Disability benefits process and having a strategy, you can significantly improve your chances of obtaining Social Security Benefits.

How Can I Afford to Pay An Attorney?

The answer is simple: you only pay an attorney’s fee if you win your case.  Generally, you do not pay an attorney anything in advance and you do not pay an attorney a fee if you do not win your case.

The SSA and federal law set attorney’s fees in disability cases.  The fee is 25% of all past due benefits, up to a maximum of $6,000. [1] Depending on the amount of your past due benefits, the attorney’s fees are usually only a small portion of your benefits award


[1] On June 1, 2009, SSA increased the maximum standard fee amount to $6,000 from $5,300.  This was the first fee increase since 1990 and represented a cost of living adjustment.

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