Social Security Disability: The Difference Between SSI and SSDI? Which One Do I Need?

Social Security Disability: The Difference Between SSI and SSDI?  Which One Do I Need?

By:  Disability Group (http://www.socialsecuritylaw.com)

The Federal Government provides two different benefits for Americans who become disabled and are no longer able to work.  Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is for workers who have paid into the Social Security system through payroll taxes and is similar to the familiar retirement benefits program.  Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is an entitlement program for those with limited income and resources and is available regardless of work history.

Can I apply for both benefits?

You can and should apply for both SSDI and SSI benefits!  It is possible that you will qualify for both programs and have concurrent entitlement, but even if you don’t you should still apply for both.

What are the qualifications for SSDI?

●     You must be a United States citizen or permanent resident;

●     You must not yet be eligible to claim retirement benefits (under 65);

●     You must have worked recently enough and for enough time;

●     You must be disabled by the Social Security Administration’s definition

To determine if you have worked recently enough and for enough time to qualify for benefits, the Social Security Administration uses a “credit” system.  Certain income levels earn you “credits” within a year and if at a certain age you have enough credits you can qualify for SSDI benefits. (To find out if you qualify or for a free consultation regarding SSDI benefits visit us at www.socialsecuritylaw.com.)

What are the qualifications for SSI?

●     You must earn less than a specific income level set by the Social Security Administration;

●     You must have limited resources;

●     You must be a United States citizen (there are a few exceptions);

●     You must be disabled by the Social Security Administration’s definition

This benefit is designed for disabled citizens with limited means and the Social Security Administration measures this by determining your income level and the value of your “resources”.  Resources can include cash reserves, stocks, bonds, or any asset that could be converted into cash.  (If you have questions about whether or not you meet the resource or income limitation for SSI benefits please contact us at www.socialsecuritylaw.com)

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